Andrew Steele
Staff Scientist
Office: 
R-243
Phone: 
(202) 478-8974

Andrew Steele uses traditional and biotechnological approaches for the detection of microbial life in astrobiology and solar system exploration. He received a Ph.D. in biotechnology from the University of Portsmouth, U.K. in 1996, and a B.S. in microbiology and biochemistry from the University of Central Lancashire, U.K. in 1992.

Areas of interest: 

Related News

Planetary Science
Mars’ organic carbon may have originated from a series of electrochemical reactions between briny liquids and volcanic minerals, according to new analyses of three Martian meteorites from a team led by the Geophysical Laboratory’s Andrew Steele published in Science Advances.
Astrobiology
NASA’s Curiosity rover has discovered new “tough” organic molecules in three-billion-year-old sedimentary rocks on Mars, increasing the chances that the record of habitability and potential life could have been preserved on the Red Planet, despite extremely harsh conditions on the surface that can easily break down organic molecules.
Department
The Geophysical Laboratory's Andrew Steele joins the Rosetta team as a Co-Investigator working on the COSAC instrument aboard the Philae lander (Fred Goesmann Max Planck Institute - PI). On 12 November 2014 the Philae system will be deployed to land on the comet and begin operations.
Department
Research made by the Curiosity science team made Discover Magazine's number one science story of 2013.
Planetary Science
Washington, DC—After extensive analyses by a team of scientists led by Carl Agee at the University of New Mexico, researchers have identified a new class of Martian meteorite that likely originated from Mars’s crust.
Department
Washington, DC, 6 August 2012 -- NASA’s rover Curiosity, the size of a small car, touched down in a Martian crater early Monday. Geophysical Laboratory scientists are contributing to the mission.
Planetary Science
Washington, DC — Molecules containing large chains of carbon and hydrogen--the building blocks of all life on Earth--have been the targets of missions to Mars from Viking to the present day.
Astrobiology
Washington, DC, 15 September 2011- New research provides direct evidence that the carbon from the Earth's surface can cycle deep into the mantle and then brought back.
Planetary Science
Washington, DC— Up to now scientists thought that the trace amounts of carbon on the surface of the Moon came from the solar wind. Now researchers at the Carnegie Institution’s Geophysical Laboratory have detected and dated Moon carbon in the form of graphite—the sooty stuff of pencil lead—which survived from the late heavy bombardment era 3.8 billion years ago.