Materials
The Geophysical Laboratory's Postdoctoral Fellow Shi Liu was awarded the 2017 APS Metropolis Award in late October.  The purpose of the award is to recognize doctoral thesis research of outstanding quality and achievement in computational physics and to encourage effective written and oral presentation of research results.
Department
Despite their beautiful new jerseys, the DTM Dynamos came up a bit short on Friday against their cross-campus rivals, our very own GL Pistons, who defended their title of the coveted MudCup! DTM dominated the first half, earning nearly a dozen corner kicks and one penalty kick.
Geochemistry
The Geophysical Laboratory dedicated two and a half days from October 23-25 celebrating the legacy and vision of Marilyn Fogel, who spent 33 years here as a Staff Scientist doing groundbreaking research and mentoring generations of young scientists of all levels—from high school interns to postdo
High Pressure
Washington, DC— Did you know that there are at least 17 crystalline forms of ice, many of them formed under extreme pressures, such as those found in the interiors of frozen planets? New work from a team led by Carnegie’s Timothy Strobel has identified the structure of a new type of ice crystal that resembles the mineral quartz and is stuffed with over five weight percent of energy-rich hydrogen molecules, which is a long-standing Department of Energy goal for hydrogen storage.   The results, published by the Journal of the American Chemical Society, could have implications for the mineralogy of icy planetary bodies as well as for energy storage technology.
High Pressure
Washington, DC— New work from a team led by the Geophysical Laboratory's Alexander Goncharov has created a new extremely incompressible carbon nitride compound. They say it could be the prototype for a whole new family of superhard materials, due to the unexpected ratio of carbon and nitrogen atoms. Their work is published in the journal Chemistry of Materials.
Department
The Geophysical Laboratory's Anat Shahar and Bob Hazen received the top two awards from the Mineralogical Society of America (MSA) during the Geological Society of America Annual Meeting on 27 September in Denver, CO.  Hazen and Shahar gave outstanding award lectures and join the likes of many GL alumni in each category.  Shahar received the MSA Award and Hazen received the MSA Roebling Medal. Congratulations to both on awards well deserved!
Geochemistry
This story took time… time, extreme pressure and high temperature. It’s a story of complex NH bedrock geology but also remarkable coincidences. It’s the story of a short-lived, nearly forgotten chapter of NH history: graphite mining in the western hills of our State from the White Mountains to the Monadnock Region.
Materials
Washington, DC—Scientists have looked for different ways to force hydrogen into a metallic state for decades. A metallic state of hydrogen is a holy grail for materials science because it could be used for superconductors. For the first time, researchers, including GL's Viktor Struzhkin, have experimentally produced a new class of materials blending hydrogen with sodium that could alter the superconductivity landscape and could be used for hydrogen-fuel cell storage.
Planetary Science
Congratulations to the Geophsyical Laboratory's own Stephen Elardo on receiving NASA's Early Career Fellowship!
Department
Congratulations to Geophysical Laboratory/DTM Librarian, Shaun Hardy, who was just selected to receive the 2016 Mary B. Ansari Distinguished Service Award of the Geoscience Information Society!
High Pressure
Washington, DC— Hydrogen is the most-abundant element in the universe. It’s also the simplest—sporting only a single electron in each atom. But that simplicity is deceptive, because there is still so much we have to learn about hydrogen.
Materials
Washington, DC— Using laboratory techniques to mimic the conditions found deep inside the Earth, a team of Geophysical Laboratory scientists led by Ho-Kwang “Dave” Mao has identified a form of iron oxide that they believe could explain seismic and geothermal signatures in the deep mantle. Their work is published in Nature.
High Pressure
Washington, DC— Earth's magnetic field shields us from deadly cosmic radiation, and without it, life as we know it could not exist here. The motion of liquid iron in the planet’s outer core, a phenomenon called a “geodynamo,” generates the field.
Department
Nagoya, Japan, 11 May 2016—Ronald Cohen was an invited speaker at the AMTC5 workshop in Nagoya May 11-13, 2016 and spoke on "Strong Coupling Ferroelectrics, How They Work and How They Can Be Improved."  He then visited ELSI (Earth and Life Sciences Institute) at Tokyo Tech and spoke on “First-principles studies of the deep Earth.”
Department
Geophysical Laboratory research scientist, Muhtar Ahart, has been awarded an Alan Berman Research Publication Award from the Department of the Navy for 2016.  
Department
On May 6, 2016 the Broad Branch Road campus honored eight employees for their years of service at the Geophysical Laboratory.
Geochemistry
Washington, DC—New work from a research team led by the Geophysical Laboratory's Anat Shahar contains some unexpected findings about iron chemistry under high-pressure conditions, such as those likely found in the Earth’s core, where iron predominates and creates our planet’s life-shielding magnetic field.
Materials
Washington, DC, 18 March 2016—Geophysical Laboratory team Tim Strobel, Venkat Bhadram, and alum DuckYoung Kim, has discovered a new transition metal, titanium pernitride, TiN2, which is ultraincompressible (bulk modulus ~360-385GPa) and could be a potential superhard material.
Department
Washington, DC, 29 March 2016—The Deep Carbon Observatory Executive Committee met on 1-2 March 2016 to discuss overarching themes for DCO’s final years—including modeling and visualization, synthesis and integration, field studies, and instrumentation—as well as plans beyond the end of the decadal program in 2019.
Department
Elissaios Stavrou, Geophysical Laboratory (GL) alumni, was appointed to staff member at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL).  Stavrou was a visiting investigator at GL from 2011-2012 and a postdoctoral associate from 2012-2013.
Department
Hokkaido, Japan, 19 February, 2016—More than 60 scientists from around the world, including many from Carnegie, gathered at the perpetually snowing Rusutsu Ski Resort for the first Solar System Symposium held in western Hokkaido, Japan from Februrary 17-19, 2016. 
Astrobiology
Washington, DC— A team of scientists including Carnegie’s Dina Bower and Andrew Steele weigh in on whether microstructures found in 3.46 billion-year-old samples of a silica-rich rock called chert found in Western Australia are the planet’s oldest fossils.
High Pressure
Washington, DC—If you freeze any liquid fast enough, even liquid metal, it becomes a glass. Vitrified metals, or metallic glasses, are at the frontier of materials science research.
Mineralogy
The Geophysical Laboratory’s own Bob Hazen will be starring in “Life’s a Rocky Start,” a PBS NOVA special on January 13, 2016 at 9pm EST on PBS. 
Department
The AGU Fall Meeting 2015 will take place in San Francisco, CA from December 13-18.  Many staff members and postdoctoral associates from the Geophysical Laboratory will attend this year.  Check here daily for live updates on each day's science presentations.
High Pressure
EFree, a research center at the Geophysical Laboratory, held a Center-wide Neutron Day on December 10, 2015 at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.
Department
The Geophysical Laboratory's Tim Strobel talks in the November issue of New Scientist about hacking silicon's structure to make it more efficient for use in computer chips and solar panels.
Mineralogy
The Geophysical Laboratory's Anat Shahar and Bob Hazen were announced as the recipients of the Mineralogical Society of America's (MSA) 2016 MSA Award and Roebling Medal, respectively.  They will receive their awards at the MSA meeting in Denver in September 2016.
Department
In August, the Geophysical Laboratory reached a major milestone - the publication of our 5,000th scientific paper!  The first Geophysical Laboratory paper was published in 1905.
Department
Last week, scientists from around the world were all about building a deeper understanding of the nature of biology, including modeling the origins of life on an abstract level starting from prebiotic conditions on Earth and, possibly, on other planets.
High Pressure
Producing materials by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has become an important means of synthesis, in which high-energy molecular and atomic species generate a kinetically stable phase trapped in local energy minimum.
Geochemistry
If you freeze a liquid fast enough, it becomes a glass, something that is structurally similar to liquid but incapable of flow. This concept holds true even for metals.
Department
Who said soccer was boring? This year’s annual MudCup was a thrilling game that featured a loaded, hungry GL team and a feisty, determined DTM team. The game started off with a bang, as within a few minutes, GL was on the board with a goal by GL captain Sergey Lobanov.
Department
Geophysical Laboratory alum Yoko Kebukawa was awarded the Geochemical Society of Japan Award for Young Researcher.  This award honors outstanding contributions to the advancement of geochemistry, cosmochemistry and environmental sciences. 
High Pressure
Iron makes up most of the Earth's core, which is very hot and exists under extreme pressures.
High Pressure
Washington, DC— As astronomers continue finding new rocky planets around distant stars, high-pressure physicists are considering what the interiors of those planets might be like and how their chemistry could differ from that found on Earth.
Mineralogy
Washington, DC—New research from a team led by Carnegie’s Robert Hazen predicts that Earth has more than 1,500 undiscovered minerals and that the exact mineral diversity of our planet is unique and could not be duplicated anywhere in the cosmos.
High Pressure
Washington, DC—Colossal magnetoresistance is a property with practical applications in a wide array of electronic tools including magnetic sensors and magnetic RAM.
Department
Former Carnegie Summer Scholar at the Geophysical Laboratory, Viktor Rozsa, currently a graduate student at the University of Chicago, has been awarded a DOE-NNSA graduate fellowship. 
Department
June 26, 2015 marks the inaugural Geophysical Laboratory (GL) and DTM poster gathering at the Broad Branch Road campus.  The Geophysical Laboratory's own Charles Le Losq, Ileana Perez-Rodriguez and Zachary Geballe were the masterminds behind the poster gathering, organizing the event and encouraging everyone on campus to participate. 
High Pressure
Washington, DC—The interiors of several of our Solar System’s planets and moons are icy, and ice has been found on distant extrasolar planets, as well.  But these bodies aren’t filled with the regular kind of water ice that you avoid on the sidewalk in winter.
High Pressure
Washington, DC— The matter that makes up distant planets and even-more-distant stars exists under extreme pressure and temperature conditions.
High Pressure
Washington, DC— Superconductivity is a rare physical state in which matter is able to conduct electricity—maintain a flow of electrons—without any resistance.
High Pressure
Washington, DC— Carbonates are a group of minerals that contain the carbonate ion (CO32-) and a metal, such as iron or magnesium.
Geochemistry
Washington, DC— New work from a team including Carnegie’s Christopher Glein has revealed the pH of water spewing from a geyser-like plume on Saturn’s moon Enceladus.
Department
Washington, DC, 28 April 2015—The high-resolution mass spectrometer “Panorama” built by Nu Instruments, Ltd. was installed in the Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences, UCLA in March.
High Pressure
Washington, DC— New work from Carnegie’s Russell Hemley and Ivan Naumov hones in on the physics underlying the recently discovered fact that some metals stop being metallic under pressure. Their work is published in Physical Review Letters.
High Pressure
Washington, DC, 14 April 2015— The cores of terrestrial planets and satellite bodies, including our own Moon, all contain large quantities of iron.
High Pressure
Washington, DC— A Carnegie-led team was able to discover five new forms of silica under extreme pressures at room temperature. Their findings are published by Nature Communications.
High Pressure
Only a small fraction of our planet’s total carbon is found at the surface.

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