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Science Highlights

Washington, D.C., 1 September 2015— As astronomers continue finding new rocky planets around distant stars, high-pressure physicists are considering what the interiors of those planets might be like and how their chemistry could differ from that found on Earth. New work from the Geophysical Laboratory's Sergey Lobanov, Nicholas Holtgrewe, and Alexander Goncharov demonstrates that different magnesium compounds could be abundant inside other planets as compared to Earth.

Washington, D.C., 26 August 2015—New research from a team led by the Geophysical Laboratory's Robert Hazen predicts that Earth has more than 1,500 undiscovered minerals and that the exact mineral diversity of our planet is unique and could not be duplicated anywhere in the cosmos.

Washington, D.C., 12 August 2015—Colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) is a property with practical applications in a wide array of electronic tools including magnetic sensors and magnetic RAM. New research from the Geophysical Laboratory's Maria Baldini, Dave Mao, Takaki Muramatsu, and Viktor Struzhkin successfully used high-pressure conditions to induce CMR for the first time in a pure sample of a compound called lanthanum manganite, LaMnO3.

Washington, D.C., 15 June 2015— New work from the Geophysical Laboratory's Stewart McWilliams and Alexander Goncharov used laboratory techniques to mimic stellar and planetary conditions, and observe how noble gases behave under these conditions, in order to better understand the atmospheric and internal chemistry of these celestial objects.